A Good Setup

What Makes A Good Setup?

Without going into technical details about it, a good setup is when the guitar is adjusted to play at its optimum.
A well set up guitar should feel comfortable to play and not feel like you’re fighting it.
It’s also important to consider that preferences vary from player to player.
For example, what may be a good string height for one player might be too high or too low for the other.
Sometimes because of structural reasons, some guitars cannot be set up the way you would like and because of this they will just not play the way you want them to.




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Benefits Of A Good Setup

Put simply, a good setup will make a big difference to your playing skills. It will allow you to play the very best you can.
A guitar that is not properly set up can make it very difficult to play.
With a beginner it can even determine whether that person will want to continue playing guitar!
Even many new guitars, both cheap and expensive, will be in need of a setup.
Often at the factory they’re given a ‘quick setup’ and shipped out to the music store.
Quite often the action at the nut (height underneath the 1st fret) will be too high making it hard to play.
The neck will often be adjusted with too much relief (the neck is bowing forward to much) making it hard to play.
The frets can also be uneven. Hard to believe really, but it’s true.

                                                                    Maintaining  A Good Setup

Sometimes after only a short time after the guitar has been set up, the neck can move a little (or a lot) and it won’t feel as good as it did. Don’t panic if this happens.
The good news is that in most cases, a minor readjustment will get you back that sweet setup.
In this day and age with such extremes in weather and temperature changes in short spaces of time, it can be difficult to maintain a consistent a setup.
Wood naturally responds to temperature changes and moves, therefore it is normal for a guitar neck to move and with acoustic guitars the tops can also typically rise or sink a little depending on the climate.
When there is more humidity in the air the top will take on moisture and swell up and rise a little.
This means the bridge has risen with it so the action will be higher.
When it’s dryer, the top will sink a little, the bridge has now gone down so the action is now lower.
Sometimes it lowers to the point where the strings start buzzing.
It’s a good idea to try and keep the guitar away from extreme temperature changes
Keep it in its case when you’re not using it.
Don’t leave it in your car either in summer or winter!
If you live in extremely dry area, buy a humidifier. Same if you heat with a wood.